FAQ

Who are the focolarini?

Who is Chiara Lubich?

How can I contact the President or the central organization of the Focolare Movement?

Does the Roman Catholic Church approve of the Focolare Movement?

Is the Focolare Movement only for Roman Catholics?

What is a Mariapolis?

What are the ‘little towns’?

How can I join the Movement?

How can I contact the closest focolare centre?

How many people belong to the Focolare Movement?

How can I take part in one of the Focolare Movement’s social projects or initiatives?

How can I receive news about the life and activities of the Focolare Movement?

Who are the focolarini?

Although on some occasions ‘focolarini’ is used to mean any who live the spirituality of the Focolare Movement, specifically the term refers to persons with a particular commitment, consecrated to God, who live in small communities (the focolare houses or centres) that are at the heart of the wider community of the whole Movement in a specific region.

Who is Chiara Lubich?

Chiara Lubich (1920-2008) is simply called ‘Chiara’ (Kee-ar-ah) by many people. She is the founder of the Focolare Movement. One of the charismatic figures of the 20th century, she contributed to strengthening communion within the Roman Catholic Church, initiated important work for Christian unity, for interfaith dialogue and for dialogue with contemporary culture. She received numerous awards, among which were honorary doctorates and honorary citizenships and she was tireless in her promotion of a culture of unity and fraternity among peoples. Millions of people throughout the world today are living her spirituality. To find out more go to: Who is Chiara?. The rich legacy Chiara left in the written word and in other audio-visual formats is held and made available at the Chiara Lubich Centre.

How can I contact the President or the central organization of the Focolare Movement?

The International Centre of the Focolare Movement can be found at this address:

The Focolare Movement – International Centre

Via di Frascati, 306

00040 Rocca di Papa (Rome), Italy.

Tel: +39 06 947989 – Fax: +39 06 94749320

To send an email click on Write to us at the top of each page on this site.

Does the Roman Catholic Church approve of the Focolare Movement?

Yes. The Focolare Movement has received approval of the Roman Catholic Church under name of the Work of Mary (Opera di Maria), which was chosen by Chiara Lubich herself. The first approval was in 1962, and was renewed with changes as the Movement developed in the following years. Definitive approval for the Statutes came in June 1990. In the decree of approval by the Pontifical Council for the Laity, it says: ‘The Movement has developed in faithfulness to its charism and it has spread and grown in maturity. It has thus brought to the Church abundant spiritual fruits and given the world a credible witness of unity.’

Is the Focolare Movement only for Roman Catholics?

Everyone can be part of the Focolare Movement. Indeed among those who belong to it are Christians of various Churches, the faithful of various religions and persons who have no reference point in any religious belief.<

What is a Mariapolis?

Mariapolis (the word means ‘City of Mary’, and Mary is seen as the representative figure of someone who lives the Gospel) is a meeting characteristic of the Focolare Movement. For a few days young people, children and adults, all from different backgrounds meet together with the aim of having, in the light of the universal values of the Gospel, an experience of fraternity. There are Mariapolises every year in numerous countries throughout the world and they take as their starting point the ‘Golden Rule’ which invites us to treat others as we would like them to treat us. Dates of forthcoming Mariapolises in the world can be found at www.focolare.org/mariapolis.

What at are the ‘little towns’?

The little towns are places of different sizes where the inhabitants try, at work, study and in every aspect of their lives, to practice the Gospel commandment of love: ‘Love one another as I have loved you’ (Jn 15:12). The little towns are also called permanent Mariapolises. The first was in Loppiano (Italy); others have been set up in different parts of the world.

How can I join the Movement?

You can be part of the Movement simply by adhering to its spirituality and putting it into practice in your daily life. If you wish to deepen your understanding of the spirituality and to participate in the Movement’s various activities, you can contact the focolare house closest to you. If you want to have a specific commitment in one of the branches of the Movement, there are various courses and schools of formation (Mariapolises, congresses and so on).

How can I contact the closest focolare centre?

To contact the closest focolare centre click Focolare World Wide select first the continent and then the country that interests you, and then look in the list of places. If you cannot find what you want, go to: Write to us and fill in the form.

How many people belong to the Focolare Movement?

The Movement is present in 194 countries, and there are about 120,000 people who are part of its structures (members) and one and a half million people who adhere to it or sympathize with it without going into specific vocations within it (adherents and sympathizers). It is extremely difficult to estimate beyond that the number of people who are touched by its spirituality.

How can I take part in one of the Focolare Movement’s social projects or initiatives?

Visit Social Commitment in the website or go to the following sites:

How can I receive news about the life and activities of the Focolare Movement?

You can have news through the Movement’s official website www.focolare.org or its newsletter that you can subscribe to on the website’s homepage.

You can subscribe to one of the Movement’s magazines, which are published in various countries throughout the world. In English they generally use the name of New City (though, Living City in the USA). Among them: in the Philippines, in the UK, in the USA.

There are also other more specialized magazines. Principally in English, for a more scholarly approach, there is Claritas: Journal of Culture and Dialogue.